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Goering's Lament
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Luftwaffe Chief Hermann Goering’s Lament

The following statements were made during the war crimes interrogation shortly after the war by Reichsmarschall Hermann Goering, long-time chief of the Luftwaffe. He poisoned himself in his cell before his death sentence for war crimes could be carried out.

“I knew first that the Luftwaffe was losing control of the air when the American long-range fighters were able to escort the bombers as far as Hanover. It was not long before they were getting to Berlin. We then knew we must develop the jet planes. Our plan for their early development was unsuccessful only because of your bombing attacks.

“Allied attacks greatly affected our training program, too. For instance, the attacks on oil retarded the training because our new pilots couldn’t get sufficient training before they were put into the air.

“I am convinced that the jet planes would have won the war for us if we could have had only four or five months more time. Our underground installations were ready. The factory at Kahla had a capacity of 1,000 to 1,200 jet airplanes a month. Now with 5,000 to 6,000 jets, the outcome would have been quite different.

“We would have trained sufficient pilots for the jet planes despite oil shortage, because we would have had underground factories for oil, producing a sufficient quantity for the jets. The transition to jets was very easy in training. The jet pilot output was always ahead of the jet aircraft production...

Next...The Military Code Of Conduct

Continued...

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